OM MANI PADME HUM

I’ve been really busy and will be busy until Feb. 17, 2011. In the meantime I just would like to make a short post about the mantra of Kuan Yin which is OM MANI PADME HUM. I do pray this mantra everyday and I find it to be a very powerful mantra.

Below His Holiness The 14th Dalai Lama explains what OM MANI PADME HUM means. Got this from the Internet Sacred Text Archive site.

On the meaning of: OM MANI PADME HUM
 
    The jewel is in the lotus or praise to the jewel in the lotus
 
  by His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso The Fourteenth Dalai Lama of Tibet
 
   It is very good to recite the mantra OM MANI PADME HUM, but while
you are doing it, you should be thinking on its meaning, for the
meaning of the six syllables is great and vast. The first, OM, is
composed of three pure letters, A, U, and M. These symbolize the
practitioner's impure body, speech, and mind; they also symbolize the
pure exalted body, speech and mind of a Buddha.
 
   Can impure body, speech and mind be transformed into pure body,
speech and mind, or are they entirely separate? All Buddhas are cases
of being who were like ourselves and then in dependence on the path
became enlightened; Buddhism does not assert that there is anyone who
from the beginning is free from faults and possesses all good
qualities. The development of pure body, speech, and mind comes from
gradually leaving the impure states and their being transformed into
the pure.
 
   How is this done? The path is indicated by the next four syllables.
MANI, meaning jewel, symbolizes the factor of method- the altruistic
intention to become enlightened, compassion, and love.  Just as a
jewel is capable of removing poverty, so the altruistic mind of
enlightenment is capable of removing the poverty, or difficulties, of
cyclic existence and of solitary peace. Similarly, just as a jewel
fulfills the wishes of sentient beings, so the altruistic intention to
become enlightened fulfills the wishes of sentient beings.
 
   The two syllables, PADME, meaning lotus, symbolize wisdom. Just as
a lotus grows forth from mud but is not sullied by the faults of mud,
so wisdom is capable of putting you in a situation of non-
contradiction where as there would be contradiction if you did not
have wisdom. There is wisdom realizing impermanence, wisdom realizing
that persons are empty of self-sufficient or substantial existence,
wisdom that realizes the emptiness of duality (that is to say, of
difference of entity between subject and object), and wisdom that
realizes the emptiness of inherent existence. Though there are may
different types of wisdom, the main of all these is the wisdom
realizing emptiness.
 
   Purity must be achieved by an indivisible unity of method and
wisdom, symbolized by the final syllable, HUM, which indicates
indivisibility. According to the sutra system, this indivisibility of
method and wisdom refers to one consciousness in which there is a full
form of both wisdom affected by method and method affected by wisdom.
In the mantra, or tantra vehicle, it refers to one conciousness in
which there is the full form of both wisdom and method as one
undifferentiable entity. In terms of the seed syllables of the five
conqueror Buddhas, HUM is the is the seed syllable of Akshobhya- the
immovable, the unfluctuating, that which cannot be disturbed by
anything.
 
   Thus the six syllables, OM MANI PADME HUM, mean that in dependence
on the practice which is in indivisible union of method and wisdom,
you can transform your impure body, speech and mind into the pure
body, speech, and mind of a Buddha. It is said that you should not
seek for Buddhahood outside of yourself; the substances for the
achievement of Buddhahood are within. As Maitreya says in his SUBLIME
CONTINUUM OF GREAT VEHICLE (UTTARA TANTRA) all beings naturally have
the Buddha nature in their own continuum. We have within us the seed
of purity, the essence of a One Gone Thus (TATHAGATAGARBHA), that is
to be transformed and full developed into Buddhahood.
 
(From a lecture given by His Holiness The Dalai Lama of Tibet at the
Kalmuck Mongolian Buddhist Center, New Jersey.)
 
Transcribed by Ngawang Tashi (Tsawa), Drepung Loseling, MUNGOD, INDIA

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About jefftan168

Numbers does not rule my life. But if there’s a number that may play a big influence in my life that is 168. You see, about six months ago, when I went into a gym and had a weigh in and body mass index reading, I found out that I was already type 2 obese, and if I’m not mistaken there are only 3 types. In fact, I need to shed about 43% of my total body weight. I’m 5’5 and my ideal weight would be 165lbs, but according to my trainer since I’ve already accumulated so much skin by stretching it too much because of my fats it’s ok to just settle with 168lbs to 170lbs. (Internal monologue at that time was 5lbs of skin!) That’s’ the reason why I’m calling this blog Project 168 because that’s my ultimate weight goal. However, being a Chinese Buddhist and a believer of Feng Shui, 168 is also considered as a celestial number that is suppose to be really lucky. Thus Project 168 also refers to my quest to have a good happy life and to be a good student of Chinese Buddhism. A word of caution though, growing up, my parents firmly believed that the next super language is not English but Chinese. Thus special focus was given for me to learn Mandarin, in fact, I was send to Taiwan on summers to further learn the language. The big disadvantage is that I’ve such a poor commando of the English language that surely you’ll see some grammatical errors in every post. However, I still decided to write this blog in English to be able to share this with people who are also trying to lose weight and who are like me are in a quest to constantly live a good life. This blog is not me talking to the world but its me sharing my experience to whoever would want to read this so that it might help them, and more important than that people might want to share with me also their experience that it might help in my quest to lose weight and also to constantly have a good life.
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